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Antique Wooden Writing Slope

$115

This antique wooden writing slope was found in Belleville, an early settlement area of eastern Ontario. The top is cut from one piece of wood and is stained in a dark, warm, reddish-brown colour. The front brass hinges open and close smoothly. The interior compartment is large enough to hold ink, pen and paper in ample supply. The slope is also light enough to pick up and move easily. The interior base is cut in two pieces of wood that have been reinforced (probably at a later date) with large serrated staples. There is a small rim of wood around the perimeter to hold paper and pens. It’s an early example of a primitive writing tool used by our early settlers and would make an interesting decorative piece in the home, library or studio. Circa late 19th century.

1 in stock

Description

This antique wooden writing slope was found in Belleville, an early settlement area of eastern Ontario. The top is cut from one piece of wood and is stained in a dark, warm, reddish-brown colour. The front brass hinges open and close smoothly. The interior compartment is large enough to hold ink, pen and paper in ample supply. The slope is also light enough to pick up and move easily. The interior base is cut in two pieces of wood that have been reinforced (probably at a later date) with large serrated staples. There is a small rim of wood around the perimeter to hold paper and pens. It’s an early example of a primitive writing tool used by our early settlers and would make an interesting decorative piece in the home, library or studio. Circa late 19th century.

Dimensions
Length: 17 3/4″ (45 cm)
Width: 19″ (48 cm)
Height: 6″ (15 cm)

Condition
Minor scattered wear and nicks commensurate with age. A small part of the outside rim is missing. See photos for details.

About Writing Slopes
Antique writing slopes were frequently used in the 18th and 19th centuries as portable lap desks, or were stored on top of a stationary table or desk to hold ink and paper. They had a sloped design to make it easier for writing at a 15-20 degree slant, an ergonomic angle which prevents neck and back injuries when writing for a prolonged period of time. They were particularly popular during King George III’s reign in England (1760-1820.) Many elaborate versions were made at this time featuring interior compartments, rare woods, leather writing pads and inlay.  The slope featured here is a simpler, more primitive version, and was designed to withstand the rugged environment of early Canadian society.

Delivery
Local pickup or delivery recommended. Please contact us for a quote if you require shipping.